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An interactive GIS map shows alarming climate change

Antarctic sea ice extent has dropped to 1.92 million sq km on 25 February 2022 (source: WMO)

The past eight years have been the warmest on record, and the global mean temperature in 2022 was 1.15 ± 0.13 °C above the pre-industrial average. This is clear from the annual report of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) on the state of the climate for 2022.

The WMO presented the highlights of the report in a web storymap created with the GIS platform of the technology company Esri, which visually shows with interactive maps, diagrams and videos the main values ​​and trends of 7 key climate indicators.

The danger of reaching the critical average annual temperature increase of 1.5°C is increasingly real, which would lead to changes in the environment, biodiversity, etc., threatening the planet. Depending on the different data sources, the storymap states that 2022 was the 5th or 6th hottest year on record.

Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the greenhouse gas with the greatest environmental impact, followed by methane and nitrous oxide. In addition to increasing average annual temperatures, greenhouse gases cause ocean oxidation and warming, melting of glaciers and sea ice, and global sea level rise.

2022 saw the lowest ocean pH levels in at least 26,000 years. Sea level has also seen a record rise of around 180mm from 1900 to the present day. The storymap also shows that the extent of Antarctic sea ice dropped to 1.92 million sq km on February 25, 2022, the lowest level on record.

The record melting of the ice in the Swiss Alps is also vividly and impressively presented – this is definitely one of the darkest records in the field of climate in the past year in Europe.

On an interactive Esri GIS map, as part of the storymap, extreme natural phenomena such as droughts, floods, excessive heat, hurricanes, etc., which have occurred around the world due to climate change in 2022, are also visualized.

Along with the negative climate trends and statistics, the WMO also presents some registered positive changes, including an increase in the production of renewable energy sources. It has seen a significant increase over the last decade – the charts in the story map show. Wind and solar, for example, reach a record 12% of global electricity in 2022.

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