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Major media are uniting against artificial intelligence

Publishers feel particularly threatened by artificial intelligence
(photo: CC0 Public Domain)

A number of major publishers are discussing forming a coalition to address the impact of artificial intelligence on the industry, the Wall Street Journal reported. The negotiations are at an initial stage, and the tasks of the future coalition have not yet been determined.

The New York Times, News Corp. participate in the discussion. (which owns The Wall Street Journal), Barron’s, MarketWatch and news agencies in the UK and Australia, Vox Media, Advance (which owns Condé Nast), the owner of Politico and Insider – Axel Springer, IAC – the parent company of Dotdash Meredith, etc. .

However, according to unnamed sources, the participants in the discussions will not be able to agree on joint protection of their interests, due to differences in priorities. Collaboration between competing publishers is extremely rare, and current negotiations show that generative AI poses a significant threat to both industry and society.

Publishers are particularly concerned that generative AI, capable of creating different types of content, including text, images and audio, delivers information directly to users, eliminating the need to click on links to information sources.

Therefore, it is important for publishers to be compensated for the use of their content in LLM training and to know their legal options for copyright protection.

IAC chairman Barry Diller said recently that in some cases where text and images available online are used to train AI tools, publishers should “take immediate action and be sure to initiate litigation.”

The CEO of News Corp. Robert Thomson has warned that intellectual property is threatened by artificial intelligence. He noted that content published by publishers is collected, aggregated and used to train AI. It can appear in individual searches, and also “will be synthesized and presented as unique when actually squeezed from an editorial.”

It should be noted that even before AI became popular, publishers tried to get compensation for the use of their content by the technology platforms, but they did so separately. For example, News Corp. and the Times have made major deals with Google, which is part of the Alphabet holding company.

Responding to the criticism, Sam Altman, CEO of OpenAI, the developer of AI bot ChatGPT, previously said the company adheres to fair use practices for content that do not require copyright permission.

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